Jane
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“If you want to build a ship, don’t herd people together to collect wood and don’t assign them tasks and work, but rather teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea.”
— Antoine de Saint-Exupery


My Korra tumblr is here!

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stormbornvalkyrie:

♕ ”I am not your little princess. I am Daenerys Stormborn of the blood of old Valyria and I will take what is mine, with fire and blood.” 


 This shoulda been my wedding dress…..

stormbornvalkyrie:

 ”I am not your little princess. I am Daenerys Stormborn of the blood of old Valyria and I will take what is mine, with fire and blood.”

This shoulda been my wedding dress…..

(via actuallygrey)

Concept art for Disney’s Sleeping Beauty by Eyvind Earle

(Source: vintagegal, via l-a-l-o-u)

sosuperawesome:

Mini paintings on cedar by Cathy McMurray on Etsy

(Source: sosuperawesome, via starry-eyed-warrior)

madame-slayer:

Pacific Rim Bomber Jackets (X)

Jill these are so cool.

(Source: setsailslash, via alexpettyfers)

Landscape/Environment Tut

badasserywoman:

Okay so i got a few notes on how i go about Environments/Landscapes…so i’ll share a method thats easy to work with….bare with me its been a little while since ive drawn them Lol

image

First thing you want to start of with in your gradient background…use what ever is your preference. Depends on the setting, ima do some type of desert/dusty place.

image

You’ll learn that the Lasso tool is gonna be your bae when it comes to environments…that and its pretty useful. Now your going to be working in three tones, 1.Dark 2.Mid 3.Light and it will always be the darkest at the front fading to light towards the back…make sense? So you will have three layers for each one to make your life easier and Lock those layers so you will only color within that area. Make sure the dark layer is on top. 

image

image

Here is where the fun kicks in…we add our dets, try to stay with each tone and dont end up making it all muddy so you cant distinguish each one. Now you can go about this any way you please, you can paint it all in with one brush ( for some reason people get anal about shit like that, thinking there great for using one brush…i think if you got tools use em if you know how to do it right.) Or you can use custom brushes…since this is a tut ill mostly use custom brushes to slap stuff around. Its up to you really, also use the lasso tool like i said its your bae.

image

The lasso can help define things better for you, so i wanted to add a structure type on the third layer. If you want to give an effect that the selection ive made is in front of the background right click your selection and invert it, add some lighting around the edges…only a little though you dont want to over do it.

image

Also if you’ve done something on a layer you dont want to mess up or paint on what you can do is create a clipping mask on that layer. Its kinda like locking the layer to that one so you dont go outside of the layer or ruin what you worked on. Make a new layer above the one you wish to attach it to and right click the newlayer, a menu will pop up, your looking for clipping mask. Once you clicked it the layer should look like what ive circled. 

image

Once your done working on each layer we are gonna put in some mist effect, this is something that helps separate each section. So make a new layer between each of your three as shown in the image. Like i said you can use what ever method you like, i just use a soft brush or cloud/mist brush to get what i want. 

image

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Now we are going to add some definition to the image a good one to use is Curves. You can find this where your layer menu is, at the bottom you’ll find it, ive circled what your looking for. On the third image is what will appear when you click curves, all you need to do is drag the little square and you’ll see some magic happen. So adjust it to your preference. If you want you can also mess with brightness/contrast too. ALSO i would recommend adding a person in the image, it gives you an idea of the scale your environment is.

image

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I was going to end it there but hey, ill show one last thing…its pretty simple. and that is some water reflection, we are going to turn the middle into water instead cause its a little boring right now. I merged all layers but the first one, you then want to make a selection and copy/paste. Free transform in the shortcut is ctrl T and do a vertical flip on it then adjust so its mirroring the top. 

image

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Now make a clipping mask like i explained earlier on the reflected surface and use the radiant tool…i think its called that lol it gives it more of a water surface like you see. For the image below it i used a custom brush which creates a water effect, aaaaaaaaaand bam you got you water now covering the area…easy huh. 

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And so this concludes the Tutorial and you have the end result. Hopefully that gave some tips on how to approach landscapes…they can be confusing sometimes on where to start. Enjoy and let me know if it was useful or not :P

(via angrycinnabun)

incidentalpiratess:

ninelivesremember:

The Walking Dead Season Five Comic Con Trailer

BETH!!!!

I have chills over every inch of my body

yumiarts:

I never did get the chance to draw her… or even get to see her one last time

yumiarts:

I never did get the chance to draw her… or even get to see her one last time

(via electronbendinggirl)

polapaz321:

You’re free now.

polapaz321:

You’re free now.

(via electronbendinggirl)

1morey:

trendsculture:

Face Swap Of The Week: Up.

Kim Jong Il and Bill Clinton going on an adventure.

1morey:

trendsculture:

Face Swap Of The Week: Up.

Kim Jong Il and Bill Clinton going on an adventure.

(via aauditor-the-transsentient)

fakegeekgirlscast:

For those of you who don’t know: we’re a podcast, and our first episode is already out and available via our website and iTunes! Since we’re in the early stages of putting ourselves out there, your support means SO MUCH. Liking our Facebook page, subscribing and rating us on iTunes, and telling your friends are easy, super effective ways of helping us out. Plus (here’s the exciting bit) we’re planning giveaways for 50 followers on Tumblr and Facebook, and probably a whole lot more once we meet this first goal. 
Thanks for reading this block of text, and thanks for liking what we do enough to follow us!

fakegeekgirlscast:

For those of you who don’t know: we’re a podcast, and our first episode is already out and available via our website and iTunes! Since we’re in the early stages of putting ourselves out there, your support means SO MUCH. Liking our Facebook page, subscribing and rating us on iTunes, and telling your friends are easy, super effective ways of helping us out. Plus (here’s the exciting bit) we’re planning giveaways for 50 followers on Tumblr and Facebook, and probably a whole lot more once we meet this first goal.

Thanks for reading this block of text, and thanks for liking what we do enough to follow us!

ladytrenchcoat:

keyblade-crafter:

2spookyvoux:

No matter how hard I try, I can’t picture the original leg. This is f—-ing amazing.

I thought it was real until i saw the paintbrush and read the comment

Holy crap!

ladytrenchcoat:

keyblade-crafter:

2spookyvoux:

No matter how hard I try, I can’t picture the original leg. This is f—-ing amazing.

I thought it was real until i saw the paintbrush and read the comment

Holy crap!

(via childrenmilk)

shouldnt:

liliannnnn:

PREACH

AMEN

(Source: justnunya, via starsthatcollide)

Five things you’ll learn in art school

lise-art:

Art school was always at the top of the big list of “Things I really ought to do” that I’d accumulated at the age of approximately fifteen. They sat us all down to fill in our applications for further education, and with the encouragement of my frankly clueless careers advisor, I slapped the most prestigious art school in the country at the top of my list.

Weeks passed and eventually I received an invitation to the entrance exams of several schools, one of which was indeed my first choice – the famous academy that was notoriously difficult to get into. The exams went wonderfully, I’d rarely been as pleased with my work as I was on the three days that I spent with all the other hopeful entrants, putting in every single drop of artistic skill and creative energy that we had in us to impress the judges.

Soon after I attended the entrance exams of another school, in a dingy little town not far from the capital, which I’d sort of accidentally listed as a choice in my application. It went horribly. During the first task I spilled water all over my watercolour painting, after which I promptly decided “That’s that”, and made very little effort in the remaining stages of the exams. I often recount the story of the interview with the judges, where I made no secret of having very little interest at all in being accepted at the school.

I tell you this, because I did not get accepted to the first, top-of-the-league school, the one which every young artist in this country aspires to attend. I got into the second, with top marks from the exams and high praise from the judges for speaking my mind in the interview.

A promising start to my life as an art student, no?

Anyway, during my time at this art school I wasn’t particularly excited about, I learned many things which may be of use to you aspiring young artists of today, and shall recount them here, in list form.

  1. Being stuck in a room full of artists makes you see your own work in a completely different light. During high school, nay, my entire childhood, I was always the one who was good at drawing. Nobody questioned it, art teachers sang my praises and my peers begged me to draw for them. That all came to an abrupt halt upon setting foot in a room full of brand new art students, every one of which had grown up thinking they were the best at what they did, much like myself.  There were meticulous traditional oil-painters, photography visionaries with endless imaginations, comic artists itching to get all their uniquely witty ideas down on paper… and then there was me. Suddenly my portraits of singers and film stars didn’t seem half as impressive as they had back at home. My mechanical pencil looked pathetic compared to the artisan paintbrushes and high-end pens everybody else seemed to have endless supplies of. Even my digital art looked lacklustre when faced with their sketchbooks brimming with gorgeous studies and fantastic concepts that I simply couldn’t bring myself to compete with.But that’s just it; you’re not competing. You’re all there to learn, and where some of the class may know a bit more about certain methods, it doesn’t mean you’re not as good an artist as the rest of them.
  2. You’ll have to learn the “rules” of everything, essentially. We all know how tedious it is to paint a colour wheel, draw those ridiculous grids for portraits, having to do every god-forsaken form of perspective task you’re given… the list goes on. That doesn’t stop after high school art class, oh no. You’ll be doing all that and plenty more right from the get-go at art school. It’s dull and cries of “It’s useless” will be heard from the mouths of many students. However, sitting through all of that is the best boring thing you could possibly do. You know the saying “learn the rules in order to break them”, and that applies to this particular subject hugely. You may well scoff, thinking you’re comic art or photography doesn’t need you to know any of the theoretical stuff, but boy will you regret it. All those times you think something doesn’t look right but you can’t for the life of you think what, I can guarantee you it’s something you’ll learn to fix by doing all that mandatory practice.
  3. Everything has been done before. That’s a fact, right? Now, we all are aware of this on some level, and this will be especially clear at the beginning of your art studies when suddenly all the ideas you had seem a bit shameful when you sit in art history class seeing it all there, done by somebody a hundred years ago and miles better than you ever could. Even looking at the work of your classmates, you’ll see the same themes, motifs, and colour schemes you’d been so proud of in that one drawing you did a while ago, and it’ll feel like a nasty smack in the face. Fast-forward a few years and you’ll look back in quite some amusement, because it really doesn’t matter. A good idea will endure the test of time, and the same is true for art. I draw funny little dogs. Cecil Aldin did the same thing at the turn of the century, but that doesn’t mean I should stop doing what I’m doing. If anything, drawing inspiration and joy from the work done before yours is a real privilege, one which can give you strength and motivation to carry on creating things you, and probably others, will love.
  4. Letting go of perfectionism is hard, I know. Sometimes you just can’t bring yourself to put down that paintbrush, especially when you’ve got a brilliant idea that just HAS to look exactly right… But then you accidentally smudge that ink or realise your proportions are completely off if you look at it from a different angle. The biggest change in my attitude towards my work throughout the years happened in art school while trying, and inevitably failing at various techniques. A sort of art-themed motto I tell myself every so often really is the key; “Improvisation is the most important skill of any good artist.” When you muck up a piece, don’t bin it. So you’ve got a great big blot of ink in the wrong place, it doesn’t matter. Do another blot on the other side, make it look like you meant it to be there. That’s what an artists does, mucks up and pretends it’s supposed to look like that. Nobody will question it.
  5. Art school doesn’t magically make you a “proper” artist. There are lots of people I know who have graduated from art school but classify themselves as hobbyists, and many professional artists who never studied art. What it will do is give you a chance to try things you’d never get to, nor think about trying at home. You’ll meet other artists who do all sorts of different things, and make useful connections. You’ll learn about the technicalities of setting up your own exhibition and what it takes to do various art-related jobs. But it’s completely up to you whether you will be a professional artist or a hobbyist when you leave. And that’s a fact.

(via helpyoudraw)